A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE MOVEMENT.

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August, 2015.

The Beryl Institute has just published a report on its biennial benchmarking study on The State of Patient Experience 2015. The entire 24 page report is available here: http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=PXBenchmarking2015

In this article, we have summarised the key findings and data contained in the report that are of particular relevance for medical practices and clinics (excluding hospitals and long-term care facilities).

Defining patient experience.
The findings identified several concepts and recommendations to consider with regards to the definition of patient experience. First, the patient experience reflects occurrences and events that happen independently and collectively, across the continuum of care. Also, it is important to move beyond results from surveys, for example, those that specifically capture concepts such as ‘patient satisfaction’ because patient experience is more than satisfaction alone. Embedded within patient experience is a focus on individualized care and tailoring of services to meet patient needs and engage them as partners in their care. Next, the patient experience is strongly tied to patients’ expectations and whether they were positively realized (beyond clinical outcomes or health status).

Patient experience remains a top priority.

Top drivers remain leadership across levels; roadblocks remain competing priorities and resistance.

Staff development and culture change efforts are top areas of investment with an increasing focus on patient engagement.

Structures for addressing patient experience widely present, organisational definition still lags.

Senior patient experience leadership and staff investment growing.
More than half of the respondents in every segment reported having a senior leader for patient experience, someone with accountability or primary responsibility for leading experience efforts.

Mandates and leadership desire continue to lead as motivating factors in addressing patient experience while priorities are evolving.
Top drivers remain leadership across levels; roadblocks remain competing priorities and resistance.

Staff development and culture change efforts are top areas of investment with an increasing focus on patient engagement.
Patient experience now recognized for the outcomes it drives, not just the practices it comprises.
When we step back again to the idea that experience from a patient and family perspective is all they encounter in care –in the clinical setting, transition points and the spaces in between – experience itself then becomes the primary systemic driver of overall outcomes.

The consumer is speaking: patient experience matters.
For the first time, in 2015 we asked a question for and from the consumer perspective on two key variables. We asked to what extent patient experience was important to consumers in healthcare and how significant experience would be in making healthcare decisions. The results were overwhelming.
Almost 90% responding from the consumer perspective said patient experience was extremely important. This reflects a growing awareness of the consumers’ role as active participant and partner versus a traditionally passive perspective.

To underline this importance, consumers also offered patient experience would be extremely significant to their healthcare decisions almost 70% of the time while almost the remaining respondents acknowledged it would have some significance. The bottom line: 95% of individuals said that experience matters not just in the moment, but as they make choices for the future.

“Being cognizant of the power and reach of patient experience and then acting with intent and purpose may be the greatest commitment to be made to healthcare today.”